Whiskey Ad done just right.

I enjoy wine now and then but nothing puts hair on your chest like a good whiskey.

I guess you could consider me “Whiskey Girl.” No, I am not trying to grow hair on my chest but nothing feels like a mix of Christmas and summertime like a whiskey coke.

As the occasional whiskey drinker,  I assume it is difficult for whiskey brands to differentiate themselves from other brands, and even other types of alcohol. [Whiskey and Bourbon and Scotch all taste the same to me, is that just me?] Especially when there is an idea that only men drink it, and hey, it’s probably mostly true.

In my mind, there are three categories, super cheap well-whiskey, like whatever comes out of that hose at the bar, then the middle men, like Jim Bean and Jack Daniels. And then lastly, you have the super pricey whiskey that you never see anyone actually buy but every refined adult has stashed away in a cupboard somewhere, for instance Crown Royal or some of that whiskey that is a billion years old and $3000.

 

Jim Bean falling in the middle category, they really are taking advantage of the idea around whiskey’s target market of them being the manliest of men. I like the idea of playing on humor as well as a stereotype of whiskey drinkers. Any advertisement that can make me chuckle while making fun of the people drinking out of tiny straws and an umbrella, is doing something right.

 

 

 

10 Tips on Writing Advertising Content from David Ogilvy

“Father of Advertising” David Ogilvy had a lot of iconic marketing campaigns. Click here to read the article or scroll on to just read the 10 tips.

 

 

1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times.

2. Write the way you talk. Naturally.

3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs.

4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize,demassification, attitudinally, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of pretense.

5. Never write more than two pages on any subject.

6. Check your quotations.

7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning — and then edit it.

8. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it.

9. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do.

10. If you want ACTION, don’t write. Go and tell the guy what you want.

 

 

David Ogilvy on Creation & Promotion